Links to Breamish Valley Home Page

The Breamish Valley promotional banner

The Breamish Valley

A picturesque landscape of high hills, open moorland, gently rolling farmland and the scenic River Breamish!

Explore...

Breamish Valley Roll of Honour

When the Light Breaks Through

When the sun’s light breaks through at Thrunton

Competition for sunlight among trees leads to a remarkably consistent pattern of tree sizes in woodlands. And all sorts of animals and plants that live in the shade of trees are also reliant on the sun breaking through the canopy at some times in order for them to survive.

Read More

Contrails

What are contrails?

Contrails (a word blended from ‘condensation trails’) are the wispy, cloud-like white lines that zig-zag across the sky in the wake of jets engines. They are made up of water droplets and/or ice crystals.

Read More

Fire Risk Breamish Valley!

Fire risk in Breamish Valley

Following the UK Government’s recent easing of the coronavirus lockdown restrictions, there have been reports of visitors to Breamish Valley not following guidance on social distancing, dropping litter and lighting barbecues. Consequently, Northumberland National Park Authority has issued instructions that, during the current hot spell, no barbecues should be lit anywhere along the Breamish Valley. To this end, a mobile roadside information panel was installed on the road into Breamish Valley just after passing through Brandon Village and shortly after the footbridge.

Read More

Chocolate Shadows

Chocolate shadows?

What colour are shadows, actually?

When I was a kid, and the only cameras available used actual film – no such thing as digital cameras then, oh no – you had to shoot in bright light. Well, not strictly true – but if you didn’t have the means to buy an expensive camera and an expensive film that could be used in low light, well, you simply had to shoot in bright light. That’s why so many of us have old black and white photos in our family collections that appear to be over-exposed, burned out or with far too much contrast between the blacks and the whites. Too much contrast and you loose the detail: those subtle textures and structures that lurk in the shadows.

Read More

Contact Us

Please use the online form...

Contact Us